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Chainsaw, Milkshake, Ragged, Biscuit

The next in my 3RW posts where I’m putting up the poems I have written based upon three random words given to me by other people.
I’ll start by thanking everyone who has so far given me ideas to work with, I am having almost indecent amounts of fun writing poetry this way. I’ve been playing around with ideas for what to do with all of these poems and I’m still unsure but will just keep writing them until I run out of ideas to work with. I’ve now 28 sets of words through and have written fourteen of them. This is group three of the poems so far.
The first of the poems here was written to the words “scintillating, erstwhile, chainsaw” by Vincent Holland-Keen (@fiskerton). He’s also the reason that I’ve not written as much the past couple of days because his debut novel The Office of Lost and Found came out over the weekend and I’ve not really been able to put it down. It has been published in eBook format by Anarchy Books and is completely fantastic. I can’t recommend it enough.
“Shenandoah”
A skyline of broken trees and moths.
Streams of cars not water
along the only direction through.
The erstwhile daughters of night and stars
lay forgotten in the shamed past,
only deer in the woods remember.
They stare at each other, the ants
as if scintillating enough to last
and outlast the natural installations.
The old men grow just tall enough
controlled by chainsaws and budgets,
watched by escaping crowds
protecting their destruction.
Sam Strong (@SamaelTB) gave me “pizza, milkshake, geese” which I think might have been the strangest process to try and fit those words into a poem. I also seem to have had a sort of green-theme to both his and Vince’s poems. Not intentional just sort of happened that way!
“Migration”
The world reversed its time
springing back and falling forward
turning nature on her head.
An arrow of geese flew too low – hiding
from a strawberry-milkshake sunset
pointing them away from home.
A confused heat trapped
in feathers over summer
encouraged by tourists eating pizza
in Neapolitan towns while the Alaskan ice melts.
Broad streams of defrosted tears
mourn the loss of un-caged birds
throughout the ever extending winters.
As we look on
troubled but understanding.

Charlotte Naylor (soon to be Charlotte Strong…as in Sam Strong of the poem above!) sent me “ragged, loom, surreptitious” via Twitter (@mithciriel).
“A Grave Hall”
Double doors swing inwards
by hands unseen
all eyes gazing up to the gallery.
A high ceiling framed either side
by ragged tapestries of
noble love and ignoble wars.
The box room with barely space
to stand beside the silent loom
with threads still caught in motion.
Everyone walks slowly along
taking nothing far away.
A surreptitious movement on a hidden staircase
and furtive knowledge lost to yet another generation
behind too many layers of wallpaper.
I’ve had so much trouble with the words that Tom (@ThermobaricTom) gave me. I think this had more entire re-writes than any of the others. I have been working with “educate, biscuit, indeterminable” and I think I’m okay with the poem now, there’s a small chance it might change again though!
“Paper Lanterns”
The first time view walking in, nerves,
rows of labelled bottles under
multi-coloured flowers on pegs
names taken from the images.
Days divided in half
eased into the fast lane
on an extra stable wheel.
Bright colours educate
with fingers paints and chunky pens.
A kitchen full of biscuit tins
and orange squash.
As many options as there are hours,
as many as there are people.
An indeterminable future ahead
paths of choices not destinies.

That’s all for now, there will be more in a few days time. Thanks for reading down this far!

Vick.

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1 Comment

  1. han smith

     /  July 5, 2011

    Kitchen countertops is furthermore known as steatite in addition to soaprock as well as is surely mainly consisting of talc and magnesium. Countertop have been used as a material for carving for thousands of years.

    Reply

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