• Blog Posts

  • Categories

  • Follow Me on Pinterest
  • Copyright of Vick Linde

    MyFreeCopyright.com Registered & Protected

How to do well on Twitter – Part Two

This is part two to my previous post because it got a little bit too long to all go into one. Part one can be found over here.

What Not To Do:
1. Be deliberately argumentative, it doesn’t work in 140 characters and Twitter is rarely the place for it
2. Use bad language – swearing, sensitive words, think of your audience
3. Writing emotive statements with no context “It’s so exciting!!!” and then not following up (as an extra one here, few things annoy me personally more than multiple exclamation/question marks)
4. Auto-Direct Messages when someone follows you back, especially if there is a plug for something you sell or other social media outlets there.
5. Using lots of numbers or underscores in your name. It makes is hard to remember when replying and looks like spam.
6. Don’t use four tweets all at once to say something. Be concise. It’s 140 for a reason. It’s okay to do this occasionally but should mostly be avoided.
7. Lots of long personal conversations in the timeline, instead try to switch to DMs. (Holding my hand up – on my personal account this is the one I’m most guilty of but I am trying to stop!)
8. Don’t hog the hashtags. This is a rare one but some people add the favourite hashtag of the day to unrelated tweets – annoying to everyone.
9. Asking for Re-Tweets and follows all the time. Occasional asks for charities are generally fine but begging people to help you advertise is frowned upon when it becomes a regular feature.
10. Bragging and oversharing. These two seem to go together, if you’ve done something amazing then share it but overshared bragging gets very irritating, very quickly.

And a few things that you should do…
1. Be an active promoter of other people’s work, make recommendations or highlight people and companies you would refer
2. Help people out, answer questions and queries if you are able
3. Keep an eye on your own feed, read back over it occasionally to see how an outsider would view it
4. If you own a business, use Twitter to promote discounts or run a Twitter-only competition
5. Try to leave a little room at the end of a tweet so you can be re-tweeted without shortening the message, 125-130 characters is a good guide.

I hope these two lists have been helpful to people. I’ll keep posting a few of the more popular business posts from my old site over here!

Vick.

Advertisements

How to do well on Twitter – Part One

DSC_4034

I first posted this as a series of Social Media and Web Service posts on my business blog but since I combined my websites all together a lot of the business posts got lost along the way so I’m re-posting my favourites.

Rather than focusing on what you should be doing on Twitter it is much simpler to get used to the things that lose you followers or make you unpopular and from that point most things are positive.
This list is split into two posts because it got a bit too long, I asked people for their dos and don’ts online and along with my own this became a rather extensive list. I’ve also added a few tips for good behaviour on Twitter at the end as well!

You can really very simply summarise what not to do on Twitter by saying; don’t be rude, pushy or cruel. However, this means lots of things to lots of people and there are many little things that some people may not even know are annoying their followers so here’s the list of things that I believe are the most annoying things to do on Twitter:

What Not To Do:
1. Re-tweeting one account too much.
2. Over-advertise yourself, it’s boring and you’ll lose followers.
3. Using lots of capitals letters, especially randomly throughout messages
4. Direct Messaging people with sales pitches, it’s almost never welcome and not very productive.
5. Using the ‘Egg’ picture that Twitter gives you before you add your own, you look like a spammer.
6. Cramming your tweets all into one period and then say nothing for a long time – splurge tweeting.
7. Follow-backs are the first thing most people complain about on twitter, don’t expect someone to follow you right back, they will if they want to and don’t follow people just for a follow back, that’s not the point of Twitter.
8. Having a blank profile. Be open in your profile, you don’t need to share lots of personal information but putting something down shows you are a real person/company not a spammer.
9. Thanking everyone who follows you, especially in the main timeline – it’s really tedious and often goes into splurge tweeting again.
10. Using text-speak and too many emoticons. Yeuch.
11. Re-tweeting part of a series of tweets so it makes no sense even if it is the best to RT if you’ve read all of them.
12. Follow and un-follow and re-follow and un-follow – it’s just plain rude.
13. Telling someone you sent them a DM or Email, if they are on Twitter they probably are capable of checking their emails and it seems pushy.
14. Over-integration of other social networks. Make sure you want to share on multiple networks, especially if your followers overlap between them.
15. Being mean. This sounds simple but everything seems much harsher when coming in 140-character bursts over the internet, it’s much easier to be hurtful than you might think. If in doubt just don’t say it.

And a few things that you should do…
1. Keep a balance of business and personal information
2. Share things that you think will be interesting
3. Join in conversations, that’s what Twitter should be about
4. Follow people you find interesting and want to hear more about
5. Use Twitter’s functions, such as lists to make the most of it

Part two of this list will be coming soon!

Vick

Website Hosting

Not the most glamorous of blog posts but one that I wanted to transfer over from my business blog because it contains something special – a treat – for you!

When I set up my website I already owned the domain name but needed hosting and looking around decided upon DreamHost. While sorting out my hosting I also set up a promo code so that if I liked their service (which I did) and I wanted to recommend them to others (which I have) then they would get a bit of a discount.

The promo code is: jackdaw19

All one word, upper/lower case doesn’t matter and they prompt you for it while you are setting up and paying for the hosting – couldn’t be easier. In fact I only wish that I had known a code to use when I set my site up originally.

One year hosting on DreamHost costs $119.40 or $100 with the code (£74 to £62 ish). You also get a discount from $214.80 to $200 – not as much of a saving but that’s largely because I would recommend only doing a year at a time for small businesses because you never know what will happen and for individuals and businesses just getting started $200 is a lot to pay all at once.

I really like DreamHost. I’ve recommended them to a lot of people all of whom have told me that they are very happy with the service. It’s also something that I now know a little about having worked on several sites using them. So – please do feel free to use and share the Promo code but also I would like to know if you have any issues either with setting it up or afterwards.

Drop me a line in the comments here and I’ll do my best to help. After using DreamHost for so long I am pretty good at finding solutions and knowing where to ask for help if I haven’t come across the problem/solution myself.

A website, even something very basic can do wonders for small businesses and ventures. DreamHost is a simple, cheap and user-friendly way of getting started!

Vick.

Moving In


Moving in day was fun, stressful and very nerve-wracking. I wasn’t nervous that something was going to go wrong, we were pretty much past that stage but I was nervous about moving in, taking on this huge responsibility.

All houses have problems, they come with big bills and many small annoyances, this wasn’t my first house purchase and I was all the more nervous because of how badly I had been burnt by my last experience (a story for another time). I was scared but I was well taken care of. I was picked up and driven to my new town – both for my safety and that of everyone else on the road while I was so distracted! I had coffee and lunch in the little service area just five minutes from my house which is very convenient and was close enough but also far enough away that day.

And then I waited. My estate agents had been great and briefed me on what sort of time I would expect to hear from them, and they were spot on. It’s always worth calling the estate agents the day before you move to sort out times and arrangements so that you know what is likely to happen and the day before is when they will have the clearest idea.
I was very lucky, I wasn’t moving out of anywhere that day. I had no chain to deal with and the previous owners of my new home were moving into an empty property so we were only waiting on the money going through. It was about 1pm when I got the call from the agents to say that the money had gone through so they had key release (meaning the house was legally mine). I went and picked them up, gave the staff a thank-you card and headed to the house. There was still the stamp duty formality to go through but that was a question for my solicitor to handle not me.

It was surprisingly fun walking through the front door, but also a little weird. Because the transaction had taken so long I had forgotten a lot of the details of the house and it looked very different when wit was empty. On the downside I saw straight-away that there was more cosmetic work to be done than I had first thought.

That first day, because I wasn’t properly moving in I took a few things that I thought I would want right off. My list included:
Kettle
Tea & coffee
A few mugs, plates, bowls and cutlery
Scissors (well actually I forgot mine and had to make do but it was on the list!)
Cleaning products and cloths
Toilet paper
Towels
Hand soap
Tester pots of paint ( I’d chosen these well in advance)
Tool kit
Tape measure
Camera
Biscuits, crisps, salad, sandwiches.
To this I would add some old clothes in case you want to have a look around the attic/garden without messing up your day-to-day clothes.

As soon as I moved in I started making a list of things that I wanted to ask the plumber/electrician/builder about so that I didn’t forget. I still forgot a few tags but most of them ended up on the list. I also started thinking of things to ask the estate agents which I did a few weeks after I had gotten the keys.
That first day was great, and I had a lot of fun but I was also very critical and kept finding problems. No doubt the house did have a lot of problems but put in perspective I am so pleased with my little home.

Vick.